Proof of hereditary elites at Chaco

Proof of hereditary elites at Chaco

Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty

Nature Communications 8, Article number: 14115 (2017)
doi:10.1038/ncomms14115

Douglas J. Kennett, Stephen Plog, Richard J. George, Brendan J. Culleton, Adam S. Watson, Pontus Skoglund, Nadin Rohland, Swapan Mallick, Kristin Stewardson, Logan Kistler, Steven A. LeBlanc, Peter M. Whiteley, David Reich & George H. Perry

For societies with writing systems, hereditary leadership is documented as one of the hallmarks of early political complexity and governance.  … ⇒

Y-DNA supports population discontinuity between Early Neolithic & Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age in Cis-Baikal

Y-DNA supports population discontinuity between Early Neolithic & Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age in Cis-Baikal

Exciting findings in the 2015 PhD thesis of Nour Moussa, a student at the University of Alberta affiliated with the Baikal(-Hokkaido) Archaeological Project.

Thesis abstract:

The study of Ancient DNA (aDNA), DNA recovered from archaeological and historic post mortem material, has complemented the study of anthropology and archaeology. There are several challenges in the retrieval and analysis of DNA from ancient specimens including exogenous contamination with modern DNA,  … ⇒

"Morphological clock" age estimate of 912 ka for Homo naledi

“Morphological clock” age estimate of 912 ka for Homo naledi

The evolutionary relationships and age of Homo naledi: An assessment using dated Bayesian phylogenetic methods

Mana Dembo, Davorka Radovčić, Heather M. Garvin, Myra F. Laird, Lauren Schroeder, Jill E. Scott, Juliet Brophy, Rebecca R. Ackermann, Chares M. Musiba, Darryl J. de Ruiter, Arne Ø. Mooers, Mark Collard

Journal of Human Evolution Vol. 97, August 2016: 17–26; doi:10.1016/j.jhevol.2016.04.008

Homo naledi is a recently discovered species of fossil hominin from South Africa.  … ⇒

The 0.05%: Proof of concept for ZooMS as a large-scale screening tool for ancient DNA research

The 0.05%: Proof of concept for ZooMS as a large-scale screening tool for ancient DNA research

Brown, S., Higham, T., Slon, V., Pääbo, S., Meyer, M., Douka, K., Brock, F., Comeskey, D., Procopio, N., Shunkov, M., Derevianko, A., & Buckley, M. (2016). Identification of a new hominin bone from Denisova Cave, Siberia using collagen fingerprinting and mitochondrial DNA analysis. Scientific Reports, 6: 23559. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep23559

DNA sequencing has revolutionised our understanding of archaic humans during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic. Unfortunately, while many Palaeolithic sites contain large numbers of bones,  … ⇒

Northern limits

Nielsen, T. K., Benito, B. M., Svenning, J.-C., Sandel, B., McKerracher, L., Riede, F., & Kjærgaard, P. C. (2016). Investigating Neanderthal dispersal above 55°N in Europe during the Last Interglacial Complex. Quaternary International [In Press — Corrected Proof: Available online 17 January 2016]. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2015.10.039

When dealing with the northern boundary of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) and the question of whether or not they dispersed into Southern Scandinavia,  … ⇒

The week in bioRxiv

Improving access to endogenous DNA in ancient bone and teeth

Peter B. Damgaard, Ashot Margaryan, Hannes Schroeder, Ludovic Orlando, Eske Willerslev, Morten E. Allentoft
February 6, 2015; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/014985

Poor DNA preservation is the most limiting factor in ancient genomic research. In the vast majority of ancient bones and teeth, endogenous DNA molecules only represent a minor fraction of the whole DNA extract, rendering traditional shot-gun sequencing approaches cost-ineffective for whole-genome characterization.  … ⇒